Monday, January 14, 2008

Wildlife Damage Control and the Sandhill Crane

Author: Kevin Doberstein

Wildlife Damage Control and the Sandhill Crane

By Kevin Doberstein Copyright Forest Wonderer 2006

With the migration of waterfowl, the issue of wildlife damage and controlling it always comes up. The Sandhill Crane is a migratory bird that returns back into Wisconsin from wintering in Florida. The habitat of this bird is generally marshes, eating what it can find.

Unfortunately the Sandhills also enjoy eating corn seedlings on the flats of central Wisconsin. The Environmental Protection Agency has recently approved the chemical anthraquinone to help the farmers keep the Cranes off of their cornfields. This chemical was originally targeted for problem birds such as Large Canada Geese. The difference between the regular high flying Canada Geese and the large Canada Geese is the size and weight. The large Canada goose migration path is much shorter and it becomes a problem to city parks, golf courses and other more natural type habitats in municipalities. It is also claiming to repel blackbirds, geese, cowbirds, robins, starlings, pigeons, horned lark and gulls. Although, these claims are not supported by true evidence. The EPA test results indicate that the compound is practically nontoxic to fish, and also believes that because of the low toxicity that this chemical presents no risk to wildlife.

With the Sandhill Crane migration back into Wisconsin, this beautiful bird is once again in the marshes of the Chequamegon National Forest. This bird is protected in Wisconsin by the migratory bird species act, and has made a great comeback. The Mississippi Sandhill Crane is still considered endangered by the Federal US Fish and Wildlife service. As of date, no petitions have been filed against the Sandhill Crane with the US fish and Wildlife office. The Sand hill can do some unbelievable damage to a newly planted cornfield. With this wildlife control product being approved maybe the Cranes and the farmer can co-exist.

About the Author: Kevin Doberstein lives in north Wisconsin and enjoys hiking and photographing nature and wildlife. He also writes articles for his website The Forest Wonderer. This site has articles concerning forest and wetland conservation issues. He also publishes a blog with informational wildlife conservation issues

About the author: Kevin Doberstein lives in north Wisconsin and enjoys hiking and photographing nature and wildlife. He also writes articles for his website The Forest Wonderer. This site has articles concerning forest and wetland conservation issues. He also publishes a blog with informational wildlife conservation issues

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