Wednesday, February 06, 2008

The Vanishing Habitat of Wetlands

Author: Kevin Doberstein

Deprivation Of Wetlands And The Threatening Of Wildlife

Written by Copyright Protected Forest Wonderer 2006

In the state of Wisconsin, since 1848, 5 million acres of wetlands have been destroyed. Not only do wetlands provide habitat for wildlife, it also replenishes the water table through natural processes. The water that is gathered is naturally filtered through the soil and then deposited into the water table. It's as simple as, the more we deplete wetlands, the more we decline our water supply.

A person from Montana wrote a letter to the editor of a local newspaper describing wetland wildlife and land developers. One of her main concerns was the no-limit policy on trapping beavers in the state of Montana. Developers in Montana are buying these wetlands I would guess at a very low price. Then they drain the wetlands to develop and prosper. Personally I see this type of developing activity in Wisconsin, especially in Northern Wisconsin where I live. I am sure this detrimental phenomenon is happening in many other areas in the United States.

Beavers also play an important part of preserving wetlands. They build dams to flood creeks and can create a wetland environment. Forest and wetland conservation ecology has proven that all different kinds of wildlife depend on this ecosystem to survive, not just the beaver. To prove that all you have to do is follow any game trail. Eventually they will lead to a wetland.

There are 11 species of turtles that live in the state of Wisconsin. Out of the 11 species 5 are endangered or threatened species. This is mainly because of the depredation of wetland habitat for a turtle. While most people really don't care if these turtles are facing extinction, they should be concerned with the declining wetlands. These same wetlands that the turtles are being deprived of are also replenishing our water supply.

Think of it this way. If the indicating low oil light keeps coming on in your vehicle, wouldn't you check the oil level in your engine before it goes dry? If the habitat of the beaver or turtle is declining, so is our water supply.

About the author:

Kevin Doberstein lives in north Wisconsin and enjoys hiking and photographing nature and wildlife. He also writes articles for his website The Forest Wonderer. This site has articles concerning forest and wetland conservation issues. He also publishes a blog with informational wildlife conservation issues.

About the author: Kevin Doberstein lives in north Wisconsin and enjoys hiking and photographing nature and wildlife. He also writes articles for his website The Forest Wonderer. This site has articles concerning forest and wetland conservation issues. He also publishes a blog with informational wildlife conservation issues.

Top Exposure on 200+ SEARCH ENGINES and DIRECTORIES Your Keywords - No Bidding - 6 Hour Placement A New Kind of Paid Inclusion from ExactSeek Sign Up Today and Receive FR-E-E Bonus Software

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

<< Home